Monday, October 9, 2017

Bad air conditioning at Prayer Breakfast irks President Museveni

The organisers of the 19th National Prayer Breakfast had everything figured, except for one thing, the air conditioner (AC).

Or at least it looked they had until President Yoweri Museveni took to the podium.
Museveni 703x422
The minimal fresh air perturbed the President so much that he gave examples of previous meetings he has attended where organisers again overlooked the need for either a properly functioning air conditioner or opening up the windows and doors.

“These days I do not know what is wrong with people. Last week I was somewhere at a new facility and the situation was the same. If you cannot provide good AC, at least open the windows,” Museveni said before delivering his official speech.

When Museveni was invited to speak, it was clear that everyone was feeling so hot, so hot that they kept ordering for bottles of water and hand funning. It is such discomfort that interrupts concentration according to Museveni.

A minute later, no one had heeded the President’s advice to at least open the windows, prompting him to order the security to do the needful in Kiswahili.

But that was not the only light moment. The audience was also treated to a very tough-tone and powerful opening prayer for the family by Cecilia Ogwal (Dokolo Women) which rhymed well with this year’s theme: … as for me and my house, we shall serve the Lord…

Quite extraordinary, the President’s speech was only as long as 10 minutes in which he expressed dissatisfaction that Africans are not living up to their Biblical purpose of, “having dominion over nature.”

To drive his point home, Museveni picked up his Bible to read from the Book of Genesis 1:24 before criticising Africans for failure to make innovations, saying that, “in 500 years, all Africa has managed to make is fire and iron.”

“Even China has been absent, but of late, they have at least copied those innovations. But Africa nothing! I hate this helpless approach where you only pray and shout as if God is deaf,” Museveni said.

Earlier, the gathering was also treated melodies from the MPs choir that included the First Lady and Minister for Education and Sports Janet Museveni and the Speaker of Parliament Rebecca Kadaga.

The long key note address from Dr Olusegun Toluhi Ayabami kept spiritual listeners on their feet as it touched general life and leadership.

President Urges More Work, Not Prayers

Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni has urged the people to spend more time working, not praying.
The President said the people’s fundamental mission on earth was to work and invent ideas and solutions that would help them have dominion over all creatures.

Museveni expressed the sentiments during Uganda’s 19th National Prayer Breakfast at Hotel Africana in Kampala that was organised by the Parliament.
The Ugandan leader pointed out that man’s fundamental mission, as stipulated by God in the book of Genesis in the Holy Bible, is dominion over nature.
He said he hates the helpless approach of people, spending days and nights “praying…praying and shouting as if God is deaf,” while ignoring the fundamental role of dominion over nature.
For the last 500 years, President Museveni noted, Africans had absented themselves from the fundamental mission of dominion over other creatures.
In the last centuries, he went on, scientific discoveries had been made by Europeans, and although the Chinese were also absent when other nations were inventing, they have been active in copying what others invented, something that Africans were not doing.
Quoting from the book of Matthew 7:15, President Museveni advised people in the gathering to be aware of false prophets who come “…in sheep clothing but inwardly they are ravenous wolves”.
In Uganda, prayer events were commonly organised by various preachers and churches.
Those who turn up were often told that during such events, they would overcome joblessness, poverty and other misfortunes.
President Museveni said he borrowed the idea of Prayer Breakfast from Rudoff Daker of Germany and Dag Kook in the US.
“They are the ones who told me about prayer break, they invited me to Washington for a prayer breakfast. That is how we started it here,” he said.

Saturday, September 9, 2017

What is DACA and why does Donald Trump want to end it?

President Donald Trump will announce Tuesday that he is ending a program that protects undocumented immigrants brought to this country as children from being deported.
Nearly 800,000 undocumented immigrants are under the umbrella of the program –the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).
According to The Associated Press, Trump is expected to call for an end to the program in six months, possibly giving Congress the opportunity to address the status of those under the program.
Trump has been pressured to end DACA by a group of attorneys general who say the action created by the executive order that started the program in 2012 is illegal.
On Friday, House Speaker Paul Ryan, (R-Wisconsin), asked Trump to hold off on killing the program to let Congress try to come up with a fix, CNN reported. 
Responding to a question about DACA, Ryan, told his hometown radio station WCLO in Janesville, Wisconsin that he didn’t believe Trump should kill the program because "I believe that this is something that Congress has to fix."
Here’s what you need to know about DACA.
What is the DACA program? 
The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program protects people brought to the United States illegally as children from being immediately deported if they are picked up by immigration officials. The program began in 2012 as an executive order by former President Barack Obama.
Is everyone in the program an undocumented alien? 
Yes.
What does the program do? 
The program allows those eligible to request “consideration of deferred action” (on their immigration status) for a period of two years. The deferred action is subject to renewal.
Does that mean you are a legal citizen? 
No. According to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services website, “Deferred action does not provide lawful status.”
How many people are in the program? 
Nearly 800,000 people are in the program.
Who is eligible for DACA? 
Those younger than the age of 31 on June 15, 2012, if they came to the U.S. before turning 16 and have lived in the country continuously since June 15, 2007.
Any other requirements? 
Those to be considered for the program must have a high school diploma or GED certification, have been honorably discharged from the military or still be in school. DACA recipients cannot have a criminal record.
Why is the president considering ending the program? 
A group of 10 state attorneys general has given the president a deadline of Sept. 5 to decide if the program will be continued. They say if Trump does not end the program by that date, they will file suit to end it.
Why do they want it ended? 
The letter requesting the executive order be “sunsetted” says the executive order creating the DACA program is unlawful.
Which state attorneys general are participating? 
The attorneys general from Texas, Alabama, Nebraska, Louisiana, Arkansas, South Carolina, Tennessee, Idaho, West Virginia and Kansas.
What has the president said about it? 
The president campaigned on ending the program, then said after he was elected that that would be a hard decision to make.
What would happen if he does end it? 
Some sources say Trump is expected to announce that the program will end but will allow those enrolled in it now to stay in the country for the length of their work permits – up to two years. No permits would be renewed. If it is ended, up to 800,000 could be deported.

What is DACA and why does Donald Trump want to end it?

President Donald Trump will announce Tuesday that he is ending a program that protects undocumented immigrants brought to this country as children from being deported.
Nearly 800,000 undocumented immigrants are under the umbrella of the program –the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).
According to The Associated Press, Trump is expected to call for an end to the program in six months, possibly giving Congress the opportunity to address the status of those under the program.
Trump has been pressured to end DACA by a group of attorneys general who say the action created by the executive order that started the program in 2012 is illegal.
On Friday, House Speaker Paul Ryan, (R-Wisconsin), asked Trump to hold off on killing the program to let Congress try to come up with a fix, CNN reported. 
Responding to a question about DACA, Ryan, told his hometown radio station WCLO in Janesville, Wisconsin that he didn’t believe Trump should kill the program because "I believe that this is something that Congress has to fix."
Here’s what you need to know about DACA.
What is the DACA program? 
The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program protects people brought to the United States illegally as children from being immediately deported if they are picked up by immigration officials. The program began in 2012 as an executive order by former President Barack Obama.
Is everyone in the program an undocumented alien? 
Yes.
What does the program do? 
The program allows those eligible to request “consideration of deferred action” (on their immigration status) for a period of two years. The deferred action is subject to renewal.
Does that mean you are a legal citizen? 
No. According to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services website, “Deferred action does not provide lawful status.”
How many people are in the program? 
Nearly 800,000 people are in the program.
Who is eligible for DACA? 
Those younger than the age of 31 on June 15, 2012, if they came to the U.S. before turning 16 and have lived in the country continuously since June 15, 2007.
Any other requirements? 
Those to be considered for the program must have a high school diploma or GED certification, have been honorably discharged from the military or still be in school. DACA recipients cannot have a criminal record.
Why is the president considering ending the program? 
A group of 10 state attorneys general has given the president a deadline of Sept. 5 to decide if the program will be continued. They say if Trump does not end the program by that date, they will file suit to end it.
Why do they want it ended? 
The letter requesting the executive order be “sunsetted” says the executive order creating the DACA program is unlawful.
Which state attorneys general are participating? 
The attorneys general from Texas, Alabama, Nebraska, Louisiana, Arkansas, South Carolina, Tennessee, Idaho, West Virginia and Kansas.
What has the president said about it? 
The president campaigned on ending the program, then said after he was elected that that would be a hard decision to make.
What would happen if he does end it? 
Some sources say Trump is expected to announce that the program will end but will allow those enrolled in it now to stay in the country for the length of their work permits – up to two years. No permits would be renewed. If it is ended, up to 800,000 could be deported.